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The Call to Justice – Meditation of the Studies in the Gospel of Luke

The Call to Justice – Meditation of the Studies in the Gospel of Luke

“If you are trying to live a life in accordance with the Bible, the concept and call to justice are inescapable. We do justice when we give all human beings their due as creations of God. Doing justice includes not only the righting of wrongs, but generosity and social concern, especially toward the poor and vulnerable. This kind of life reflects the character of God.” (Tim Keller, Generous Justice pg. 18)

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Transforming Prayer – Meditation of the Studies in the Gospel of Luke

Transforming Prayer – Meditation of the Studies in the Gospel of Luke

Soren Kierkegaard said, “Prayer does not change God, but it changes him who prays.” I would add that it also changes our experience of who God is. God is the same yesterday, today and forever. The same God who did not fail us on the cross will not fail us in the whole of our lives. But this does not mean that he will always answer us when and how we expect him to. Often times he does not—not because he is failing us, but because he is forming us and even healing us.

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Following Christ – Meditation of the Studies in the Gospel of Luke

Following Christ – Meditation of the Studies in the Gospel of Luke

Towards the end of Luke 9 we are told that Jesus’ “set his face toward Jerusalem.” It is, according to Green, a phrase that evokes an austere determination to go to the very place where he would suffer rejection and ultimately [death]…But he did not go to Jerusalem to die; he went to fulfill with the whole of his life the divine purpose, which was to bring life, healing and redemption to the whole of creation (see Hebrews 12:2).

We are all called to set our face towards to Jerusalem—to seek to fulfill the divine purpose through the whole of our lives…But we do not do so for the sake of death; we do so for the sake of Life, and Abundant Life, at that.

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A Charge to Keep – Meditation of the Studies in 2 Timothy

A Charge to Keep – Meditation of the Studies in 2 Timothy

Filled with pathos, urgency, and beauty, every verse of II Timothy is a reminder to Timothy that “the precious gospel was now committed to him, and that it was now his turn to assume responsibility for it, to preach and teach it, to defend it against attack and falsification, and to ensure its accurate transmission to the generations yet to come.” (Stott, 21) And now it is just as urgent a reminder to us, for now the precious gospel is committed to us.

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Living Stones of the Temple – Sixth Meditation of the Studies in 1 Peter

There is another difference between our liturgy and Peter’s plea: the first emphasizes our need for the Church. The second emphasizes the Church’s need for us. Both are true. Indeed “all of every age and station stand in need of the grace which it alone supplies”. But also it is only through our participation that this grace is mediated. We are in the church not just because we need it, but because it needs us and Christ calls us to meet that need.

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A New Direction for Tolle et Lege

A New Direction for Tolle et Lege

Beginning next week we will be making a change with Tolle Et Lege. Instead of posting meditations on the liturgical readings for the coming Sunday, we invite you to join us as we read the Holy Scripture book by book. We will begin by reading two books which we love dearly. On Mondays we will we will read and Kathleen will write a meditation on the Gospel of Luke, and on Thursdays I will do the same with the book of I Peter

Why the change? For the joy of it and to keep things fresh for both us and you…

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St. John Chrysostom’s Sermon on Christmas in Celebration of the Nativity of the Lord

St. John Chrysostom’s Sermon on Christmas in Celebration of the Nativity of the Lord

Wherefore He became flesh, so that He Whom heaven did not contain, a manger would this day receive. He was placed in a manger, so that He, by whom all things arc nourished, may receive an infant’s food from His Virgin Mother. So, the Father of all ages, as an infant at the breast, nestles in the virginal arms, that the Magi may more easily see Him. Since this day the Magi too have come, and made a beginning of withstanding tyranny; and the heavens give glory, as the Lord is revealed by a star.

To Him, then, Who out of confusion has wrought a clear path, to Christ, to the Father, and to the Holy Ghost, we offer all praise, now and for ever. Amen.

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The Gift of Love – Second Reading in Preparation for the Nativity of the Lord

The Gift of Love – Second Reading in Preparation for the Nativity of the Lord

St. John also tells us that “God so loved the world that He gave His only Son.” We immediately, and quite rightly take this to mean that he gave his only son to die on our behalf. Yet there is more to it than that; He gave his only son not just to die but to live, and by his living make Himself known to us…Later in life, St. John wrote simply and profoundly: “God is love.” (I John 4:16) How did he know that? What made him so sure? He knew it because he knew Jesus. He had watched him live and he had watched him die.

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God’s D-Day in Jerusalem – First Reading in Preparation for the Nativity of the Lord

God’s D-Day in Jerusalem – First Reading in Preparation for the Nativity of the Lord

It is in this light that we should see the passage for today. This is a paean to those who bring the good news of God’s D-Day, his reinvasion of planet earth, of the beachhead he has established in Bethlehem, and of the spread of that light throughout the world…The invitation is there for each of us who have seen his coming to join their glad and happy announcement, to bring to everyone the grand news of God’s D-Day in Bethlehem, that, as John shouts , “the Light shines in the darkness and the darkness cannot overcome it!” (John 1)

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Bearing Christ – Gospel in Preparation for the Fourth Sunday in Advent

Bearing Christ – Gospel in Preparation for the Fourth Sunday in Advent

This is the type of surrender to which we are all called, one in which we don’t measure out our faith or faithfulness by the quantity (or quality!) of specific deeds themselves, but by the depth of our own “Yes” to God and all the challenges, discomforts and hardships this may entail. As Fred has captured beautifully in the first two posts of this week, it may take us to places we never imagined we’d go and put us in situations we would be otherwise prone to avoid (namely, the cross!), but the value and power of that obedience to bring God’s healing and redemption to not only our own lives but also those in the world around us inestimable.

For it is the means by which we, like Our Lady, bear Christ in and for the world around us.

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