God’s Promises

A God Who Keeps His Promises – Second Meditation of Advent

A God Who Keeps His Promises – Second Meditation of Advent

During those 600 years of waiting, the cry of every faithful Israelite must have been, “How Long, O Lord, How Long?” But no matter how great the darkness, no matter how impossible the situation seemed, God did not fail in his promises. To the contrary he fulfilled them more abundantly than they could have ever imagined. He fulfilled them in Christ.

As you look to the Christ child this Christmas, see there not simply a babe in a manger, but the supreme and earth-shattering evidence of a God who does not fail in his word, even when we fail him. For he is the God is the God of Love, the God who keeps His promises.

More

An Inexpressible Gift – Second Reading in Preparation for the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

An Inexpressible Gift – Second Reading in Preparation for the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

“One of Paul’s favorite analogies to describe the relationship with God that we gain through baptism is adoption…What I love about this analogy is what it reveals to us about the type of interaction that God wants to have with us. He does not interact to us as a master to his servants, nor does he relate to us as an aloof king to his subjects. He reacts to us precisely in the way the best father in the world would interact with each of his children: with a unique love for each and every one of us in which he cares about absolutely every aspect of our lives. Nothing is too small or great to take to our daddy.”

More

A God Who Keeps His Promises – Gospel in Preparation for the Third Sunday in Easter

A God Who Keeps His Promises – Gospel in Preparation for the Third Sunday in Easter

Fulfillment is at the heart of the Easter message. Our God keeps his promises; every one of them. God has promised salvation and what he has promised he has done! In fact, in Christ God has answered and is answering every promise He has ever made. The apostle Paul captures this beautifully in one great exclamations: “For in him all the promises of God find their Yes! That is why we utter the Amen through him to the glory of God.” (II Corinthians 1:20)

More

The God Who Keeps His Promises – First Reading in Preparation for the Fourth Sunday in Advent

The God Who Keeps His Promises – First Reading in Preparation for the Fourth Sunday in Advent

During those 600 years of waiting, the cry of every faithful Israelite must have been, “How Long, O Lord, How Long?” But no matter how great the darkness, no matter how impossible the situation seemed, God did not fail in his promises. To the contrary he fulfilled them more abundantly than they could have ever imagined. He fulfilled them in Christ. As you look to the Christ child this Christmas, see there not simply a babe in a manger, but the supreme and earth-shattering evidence of a God who does not fail in his word, even when we fail him. For he is the God is the God of Love, the God who keeps His promises.

More

God is Able! – First Reading for the Twenty Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time

God is Able! – First Reading for the Twenty Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time

“At the center of the Christian faith there is the conviction that in the universe there is a God of power who is able to do exceedingly abundant things in nature and in history…The ringing testimony of the Christian faith is that God is able….Let this affirmation be our ringing cry. …When our days become dreary with low hovering clouds and our nights become darker than a thousand midnights let us remember that there is a great benign Power in the universe whose name is God, and he is able to make a way out of no way, and transform dark yesterdays into bright tomorrows” –Martin Luther King, Jr.

More

Forward by Faith! – First Reading of the Twenty Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Forward by Faith! – First Reading of the Twenty Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time

As we meditate on this passage given to us in this first reading, we are challenged to take as our own the very hope to which it points, the same hope that inspired and sustained Tindley in the midst of his struggles. Like he, we are called to trust that no matter where we find ourselves, no matter how painful or ominous the situation, “A better day is coming, the morning draweth nigh when girded right with holy might shall overthrow the wrong. When Christ our Lord shall listen to every plaintive sigh and stretch his hand o’er all the land in justice by and by.”

More

The Source of All Things – Second Reading of the Twenty First Sunday in Ordinary Time

The Source of All Things – Second Reading of the Twenty First Sunday in Ordinary Time

We are told that if we seek our own well-being and order or lives to suit our own bald ambitions, we will find life to the fullest, but in fact the contrary is true. Not only do we have no right to jealously guard our possessions against the wellbeing of others or the glory of God (for we are but stewards), but experience shows that those who do so end up living a diminished, fear-filled existence. They are the Gollums of the world. Life itself can only be found to the fullest when it is surrendered in trust to the God from whom it comes, for He is the Lord of Life. The same Lord who came that we might have life and have it in abundance also said that those who love their life will lose it and called each of His followers to take up their cross and follow Him.

Indeed, it is only through the cross that we have the hope of sharing in His divine life.

More

An Enduring Love, an Irrevocable Call – Second Reading for the Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time

An Enduring Love, an Irrevocable Call – Second Reading for the Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time

I love how Paul’s extraordinary heart and mind pour through these words. You can almost see a little twinkle in his eye as he writes “life from the dead”, for is that not the very hope on which Christianity is founded: that death is no longer the final enemy and has been ultimately defeated through Christ’s own sacrificial death and resurrection? “Death, where is thy sting? Grave where is thy victory?” he writes elsewhere tauntingly.

Death, in the end, is no match for the redeeming power and love our Lord.

More

Come to the Banquet – First Reading for the Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Come to the Banquet – First Reading for the  Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Still the invitation goes out, “Everyone who is thirsty, come to the waters”. Still the words are spoken, “This Is my body” and “This is my blood”. Still all who receive the bread and wine receive Christ himself. It is no mere symbol. It is no mere remembrance. It is the promised banquet where we receive real mercy, real grace, real pardon and peace, for we receive the real presence of Jesus, who is not only the host, but the banquet itself.

More

Holiness and Hope – Second Reading for the Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Holiness and Hope – Second Reading for the Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

One of the last things any of us wants to hear in the midst of suffering is that somehow God will bring good out of that situation. But Paul is talking about far more than some sort of spiritual “making lemonade out of lemons.” This passage speaks to us about the restoration of a grace that we have lost by our sin, the grace of original holiness. God created us in freedom not so that we might rebel against him, but so that we might partake in his divine life and share in his glory (CCC 398). This is the great and unfathomable good for which we have been created; this is the great and unfathomable good from which we cut ourselves off by our sin. And it is the great and unfathomable good towards which God is able to work all things—our mistakes, our successes, our grief and our joy—for those who love Him.

More