Humility

Clothed in Humility – Meditation of the Studies in 1 Peter

Clothed in Humility – Meditation of the Studies in 1 Peter

The word Peter uses which we translate “clothe yourselves” specifically calls to mind the tying on of a servants apron and Peter could not help but have in mind that moment at the last supper when his Lord tied on such an apron, knelt down, and washed his feet…This is the model of the humility that is meant to be the mark of Christian leadership: Jesus. We are to be like Jesus. We are to lead not by grasping and climbing but by stooping and serving. The humility we live is not found in thinking less of ourselves but, again as C. S. Lewis says, thinking of ourselves less.

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He Lifts Up the Lowly – First Reading in Preparation for the Thirty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time

He Lifts Up the Lowly – First Reading in Preparation for the Thirty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time

God lifts the lowly, not only by seeing their need and meeting it, but by raising them in their lowliness to the places of honor in the work of His kingdom…no matter how low you are or how poor another is, never make the mistake of thinking you or they have nothing to give. It may only be a smile, a cup of water, or a “Yes”, but in the hands of God it will be a significant part of his work. It will have a place of honor. Do not doubt it for a moment.

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Holy Jealousy – First Reading in Preparation for the Twenty Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Holy Jealousy – First Reading in Preparation for the Twenty Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

To pray “Thy kingdom come!” should imply a gladness in whatever means it comes. Whether it comes by you, me or the neighbor down the street should not matter. Whether you get credit for it or I do should not matter. We should be just as thrilled if it comes by another as by us…”

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All Things Through Christ – Second Reading of the Twenty Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time

All Things Through Christ – Second Reading of the Twenty Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time

…the misuse of this verse by some must not be allowed to keep the rest of us from the glory of its message: There is nothing in this world you or I will ever face that, with God’s help, will not be able to overcome. There is nothing in this world we need to accomplish that, with God’s help, we cannot accomplish. So make the note cards and tape them to your refrigerator. Memorize the verse and repeat it ten times a day. Put a plaque by the door with this verse and never leave the house without glancing at it. Do whatever it takes to ingrain in your mind and heart the great truth God has for you: that YOU can do all things through him who strengthens you.

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Called to Greater Glory – Second Reading for the Twenty Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Called to Greater Glory – Second Reading for the Twenty Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

“…this is not to say that positions of power or prestige are inherently bad. They clearly are not; nor is it to say that in being called to humility and selfless love we are not called to strive towards excellence in our work. God is not glorified by mediocrity. Rather it is to say that all that we do, all that we strive towards in our lives must be driven by that same humility and sacrificial love that led our Lord to the cross, and have as its aim the same end which was achieved there: the glory of God and the outpouring of his love on the world.”

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An Enduring Love, an Irrevocable Call – Second Reading for the Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time

An Enduring Love, an Irrevocable Call – Second Reading for the Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time

I love how Paul’s extraordinary heart and mind pour through these words. You can almost see a little twinkle in his eye as he writes “life from the dead”, for is that not the very hope on which Christianity is founded: that death is no longer the final enemy and has been ultimately defeated through Christ’s own sacrificial death and resurrection? “Death, where is thy sting? Grave where is thy victory?” he writes elsewhere tauntingly.

Death, in the end, is no match for the redeeming power and love our Lord.

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Humble and Riding on an Ass – First Reading of the Fourteenth Sunday In Ordinary Time

Humble and Riding on an Ass – First Reading of the Fourteenth Sunday In Ordinary Time

Look, if you will, at only one small portion of the week that follows Jesus’ entry to Jerusalem – the Last Supper (or perhaps the king’s royal banquet?). When all had arrived the king girded himself with a towel, got on his knees and washed his subject’s feet. Then, at dinner, he took bread and a cup and said, “This is my body given for you and my blood shed for you”. This king rules from his knees and his throne is a cross. He himself says, “The Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many”.

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