Service

Clothed in Humility – Meditation of the Studies in 1 Peter

Clothed in Humility – Meditation of the Studies in 1 Peter

The word Peter uses which we translate “clothe yourselves” specifically calls to mind the tying on of a servants apron and Peter could not help but have in mind that moment at the last supper when his Lord tied on such an apron, knelt down, and washed his feet…This is the model of the humility that is meant to be the mark of Christian leadership: Jesus. We are to be like Jesus. We are to lead not by grasping and climbing but by stooping and serving. The humility we live is not found in thinking less of ourselves but, again as C. S. Lewis says, thinking of ourselves less.

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The Image of True Leadership – Meditation of the Studies in 1 Peter

The Image of True Leadership – Meditation of the Studies in 1 Peter

That image is captured in one word: Shepherd. Not a title of authority…but the humble role of one whose task is to serve the needs of those he oversees: to guard, protect, feed, and care for his flock…The shepherd is a servant of those whom he leads for their well -being. He lives with the sheep and is almost one with them. As Pope Francis has said, good shepherds always have “The odor of the sheep”.

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Chosen and Destined by God – First Meditation of the Studies in 1 Peter

Chosen and Destined by God – First Meditation of the Studies in 1 Peter

…Christians are to be, as has been said so often, in the world and for the world, but not of the world. The fact is that it is the Christians’ very difference from the world that is their great contribution to the world. We are not meant to fit in but to stand out (in a good way) and, by doing so, become “the salt of the earth and the light of the world”. (Matthew 5)

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Whom do We Serve?- Second Reading in Preparation for the Twenty Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Whom do We Serve?- Second Reading in Preparation for the Twenty Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Certainly all of us, no matter what our financial position, should pause and evaluate the role money and possessions play in our lives. They can be wonderful servants but are hellish masters. Only One deserves the title “Master” in our lives, and in his service comes not hell but heaven. Jesus is Lord.

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Servant of All – Gospel in Preparation for the Twenty Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Servant of All – Gospel in Preparation for the Twenty Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time

To “be last of all and servant of all”, to “humbly regard others as better than yourself” is to have an eye to those who are most in need and to seek out the ways—however big or small—that we can serve and love them in that need. In so doing, we die not only to ourselves, but to the world that entices us to seek or our own ambitions and glory, but we will undoubtedly find life in Christ.

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Divine Intimacy- Gospel in Preparation for the Twenty Third Sunday in Ordinary Time

Divine Intimacy- Gospel in Preparation for the Twenty Third Sunday in Ordinary Time

What we have is not just a parable or story about a healing, but the recreation of a scene that had left a profound impression on its few witnesses not only for its results, but also for its details. This is a real story about a real encounter between a real individual and Jesus, and in this case it is not the Devil, but God himself—the God who knows and cares about individual lives and stories, individual needs and desires—who is to be found in the details.

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Boasting in the Lord – Second Reading in Preparation for the Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Boasting in the Lord – Second Reading in Preparation for the Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

As we grow in our spiritual life, as we serve more and more, as we accomplish greater things for God, our fallen human nature tends toward taking more and more of the credit and, eventually, trying to do more and more on our own so we can get the credit. We begin doing things more FOR Jesus than WITH and THROUGH Him. Sadly, the result is the demise of our own soul and the diminishing and souring of all we do. No wonder Paul was thankful for those gifts of weakness in his life. They are what reminded him of his need for grace.

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No Greater Love – Second Reading in Preparation for the Second Sunday in Lent

No Greater Love – Second Reading in Preparation for the Second Sunday in Lent

The passage begins, “Jesus, having loved his own…he loved them to the end.”(John 13, emphasis mine) Then it describes his taking a basin and towel and washing his disciples’ feet. Only a few moments later he took bread and broke it saying “This is my body given for you”.

The bread and wine, the Cross all plead , “There is nothing so great I would not sacrifice for you.” The basin and towel plead, “There is nothing so small or menial that it is beneath my care for you.”

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For the Sake of Others – Second Reading in Preparation for the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

For the Sake of Others – Second Reading in Preparation for the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

“Paul reminds them of the basic rule of life…He always tried to do what was best for others, not for himself, and in that he had been copying the Messiah himself (see Romans 15:2-3). They must now learn to copy him. If all Christian teachers had it in mind that their hearers were also observers, and that the lessons they learned with the eye would be the ones that went deepest, the gospel might have advanced further and faster.”(Wright, I Corinthians, p. 138)

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Called to a Higher Love – Gospel for the Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Called to a Higher Love – Gospel for the Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time

William Barclay says, “To be truly religious is to love God and to love the men whom God made in his own image; and to love God and man, not with a nebulous sentimentality, but with that total commitment which issues in devotion to God and practical service of men”. The way I see it, faith is not difficult because of its complexity…It is difficult because it call us to submit this truth and live it out with the whole of our lives. In the words of G.K. Chesterton, it is not that Christianity has been tried and found wanting, it has been found difficult and left untried.”

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